The 49ers announced this morning that they are bringing in Tim Ryan to replace Eric Davis as the color analyst for the 49ers radio broadcasts.

This is a bit of a surprise move as Davis has only been in the 49ers booth since replacing Gary Plummer at the beginning of the 2011-2012 season. In my non-expert opinion, I thought Davis did a good job. He had no problem breaking down plays and explaining the action to those who couldn’t watch the game on TV. He also seemed to have nice chemistry with Ted Robinson.

EDMatt Maiocco has an explanation that makes some sense:

With the 49ers’ move into Levi’s Stadium in Santa Clara next season, the team plans to increase the amount of team-produced media.

Former 49ers cornerback Eric Davis, who has served as the 49ers’ radio analyst the past three seasons, would have been unable to participate on a regular basis due to his daily work in Southern California on NFL AM, the NFL Network’s morning show.

“I loved the gig the past three years,” Davis said in a text message. “With the new in-house media format the team will have moving forward, they want their guys on site almost daily at the facilities. I couldn’t work (that) with my network gig. All’s good on both sides. Simple logistics.”

TRRyan has a long track record as a broadcaster but has primarily only been on TV, in that he wasn’t always thought very highly of. From Sports on Earth’s “The Best and Worst NFL Announcers”:

While Dierdorf may carry the torch as the worst commentator in the NFL, the Myers/Ryan crew holds the honor of worst tandem. Ryan loves him some clichés, as 20 of his 55 infractions came in that category. Some of his favorites include “peak at the right time,” “they believe they can win,” “its all about courage and no fear,” “this team is building character and starting to believe” and “who’s going to step up and make a play?” On four separate occasions he reminded viewers that football is a “win-loss business.” He also had this gem at the end of the Week 5 Panthers-Cardinals game: “Nobody can point fingers; everyone needs to look themselves in the mirror and self-reflect.” I now imagine Tim Ryan standing in front of a mirror trying to peer into his soul.

Ryan had some noteworthy nonsensical statements as well. He doesn’t know when to use “well” vs. “good” (“they play good in December”). I don’t know what the phrase “play opportunities” means, but Ryan uses it a lot. He will surely be getting an angry telegram from Bob Costas for the phrase “Dansby shot his gun up inside there.” I would be just fine if Tim never says “Pick-six house call touchdown” again. He also believes “People don’t know J.J. Watt as a household name” and “[with] social media it’s easy to forget how good Arian Foster has been.” To begin a sentence with, “The problem with being down 14 points …” sets the rest of the sentence up for failure. And, perhaps my favorite: “I’ll tell ya, Seattle’s gotta keep ‘em out of the end zone in terms of a touchdown here.” No, in terms of bunnies. Seattle has to keep them out of the end zone in terms of bunnies. OF COURSE IN TERMS OF A TOUCHDOWN THAT’S THE ONLY WAY YOU GET INTO THE END ZONE DEAR GOD TIM RYAN.

Chris Myers does more talking than the average play-by-play guy, perhaps as a result of recognizing how bad Tim Ryan is at his job.

It will be interesting to see how well he is able to transition that experience to radio and how is able to work with Robinson. Another note is that Ryan doesn’t have much of a 49ers background beyond his time calling 49ers preseason games, playing his college football at USC and professionally with the Chicago Bears. Even though football isn’t as big as baseball on the radio, it will interesting how this switch in broadcasters is received by 49ers fans.

And that’s how we’ll segue into today’s Amici’s contest question:

What do you, the sports-listening consumer, think about the Tim Ryan hire?

Someone who comments will win a Large Pizza (any toppings) from Amici’s East Coast Pizzeria.