Alex Smith

Barry Zito’s potential redemption story could be similar to Alex Smith’s

By Guest Contributor Kyle McLorg

Many people consider Alex Smith’s career apex to be the final 12 seconds of the divisional playoff, however it’s my belief that the Sunday that followed held an experience more special. In an expected change of pace, the 49ers introduced their offense, rather than their highly touted defense, in the pregame ceremonies. It’s not that this hadn’t been done before, but typically the final player introduced is a fan favorite — in the 49ers’ case, Frank Gore.

The NFC Championship brought something new, something that hadn’t been done in many years. The last player introduced was Smith. He was greeted by a roar so deafening that the PA announcer was drowned out completely. 49ers fans had finally taken to standing behind Smith.

The lone goat

Somewhere, Barry Zito may have hung his head and groaned. Despite being Giants fans’ most hated free agent signing, Zito could always lean on Smith to at least share the title of “goat” in San Francisco. But after the 2011 season that the Smith enjoyed he found a way to shed the title of “bust.” Zito now stands all alone, but time has not run out for him yet.

We all know the stories: In the red corner we have Smith – the first overall pick whose play ranged from mediocre to awful for the better part of a decade. In the orange corner: Zito, for whom the Giants sold off a small island (or their supposed ability to sign a high-profile free agent bat, anyway) to afford. In return, we’ve watch him crumble game in and game out for the entirety of his contract.

At the worst of times these two men were not much different. They both showed up in San Francisco with large price tags and even larger expectations. They both fell apart pretty much immediately. They both displayed flashes of brilliance from time to time, but overall they produced respective bodies of work that equated to failure.

Handle with care

Their most striking similarity, however, is their emotional fragility. Smith, in his darkest moments, seemed almost incapable of believing he could be a winner. His knack for folding under pressure was visible — but after comparing Alex’s season with Harbaugh to those that he experienced with the Mikes, we finally discovered why he lacked in self-belief. Smith needed a strong external backbone to excel, and Harbaugh played that role in Smith’s exoskeleton.

Zito’s meltdowns on the playing field are equally visible. However, contrary to Smith, Zito’s knack for self-degradation seems to come from within. Perhaps it is the pressure of a $126 million contract, maybe it’s a losing mentality spawned from recurring failure, perhaps it’s as simple as a lack of command and below average velocity. One thing is certain with Zito — it doesn’t stem from coaching. The Giants coaching staff has been all too understanding. Zito’s leash was at times probably too long for the good of the team. Dave Righetti, Brian Sabean and Bruce Bochy were loyal to Zito (and his contract) – at times to a fault.

The (forgiving) City by the Bay

It’s time for Barry Zito to unlearn that inherent failure. If Zito can take anything of value from Alex Smith’s redemptive tale, it’s that time has not run out for the lefty. San Francisco is a forgiving town; perhaps the most forgiving sports city in America. This is evidenced from the three game run Zito went on after returning from his injury last season. The sports radio calls were optimistic, but hopes for a turnaround were ultimately unfulfilled.

Zito’s contract ensures that he has plenty of time left to make good with fans. At $19 million in 2012 and $20 million for 2013 (along with either $18 million or a $7 million buyout in 2014), it would be hard to imagine Zito getting dealt or even finding a home in the bullpen. But forget 2013 — he will get meaningful starts this season. He will have to make the most of them.

Exactly how good Zito needs to be in order to be forgiven is a whole different can of worms. Many Giants fans may never allow Zito back into their hearts, no matter what kind of redemption he may end up discovering. But the Bay Area has a rather short memory when it comes to players that they had once branded a “goat.” Smith found a way to overcome the label. Now it’s Zito’s turn.

You can find more of Kyle McLorg’s writing at Ruthless Sports. Follow him on Twitter @Ruthless_Sports.

22 Comments
22 comments
Licky
Licky

Wouldn't it be funny if Barry Zito bulked up and conditioned himself in the off-season to add 5 mph to his fastball, went back to his old three pitches (fastball, change-up and curve), reverted to his old throwing motion and shaved his facial hair.

Rick Reusch-Roll
Rick Reusch-Roll

I appreciate the embroidered optimism, an important fandom niche, but this premised tenor reaks of a grasping-at-straws need to create a dramatic connection where there is none. I personally don't need that fantasy to enjoy the game. Rather, I humbly look forward to following Zito's ongoing career on its own terms; that, Harbaugh's absence of prejudgment or need of redemption, is what I think most helped Smith himself succeed.

DM
DM

Where is Zito's version of Mike Nolan, Mike Singletary, and ultimately Jim Harbaugh? Because in order for there to be parallels, Zito would need to have been mismanaged and criticized by inept coaches before finally having his potential realized by a competant one.

Ruthless_McLorg
Ruthless_McLorg

I saw an interesting stat, I think ninersnation retweeted it - In alex's entire career, high school through the pros, he was something like 60-4 (dont quote me on the exact number) with coaches not named mike. My point is that Alex did enjoy great success in college. Not in the pros until this year, but he garnered a lot of attention at Utah.

Dan The Pundit
Dan The Pundit

All these points are valid, the only thing not mentioned was the Alex Smith had never known what it was like to be good at what he does. Zito has won a Cy Young award, he's pitched well in meaningfull playoff games. Alex finally achieved, Zito would actaully have to rise from the ashes of his once stellar, but now burnt out career.

Doctor Kajita
Doctor Kajita

I wish Barry Zito would become the next Aaron Rowand. Gone.

DW
DW

How many more of these "Next Alex Smith" stories are people going to try to squeeze out? Geez.

Stan
Stan

Last year Grant Cohn said the same exact thing. I said-no chance. Because I reasoned,Zito has been on nothing but a slide for 6-8 years,and Zito is 31. Now 32 going on 33,with injuries he never had before and no motivation at all due to that mountain of money,it's more with him of how does he hurt the team least. Hide him at the 5th spot,and have the vaudeville hook ready.

Ruthless_McLorg
Ruthless_McLorg

I appreciate your embroidered AP lit-style vocabulary, an important blog commenter niche, but this self important tenor reaks of a grasping-at-straws attempt to sound smarter than me when you really don't need to. That's all I really got on that. Thanks for reading!

Ruthless_McLorg
Ruthless_McLorg

I said it plainly in my writing: Zito's emotional (and thus physical) instabilities do not stem from coaching or managing. They come from within. Perhaps a lack of motivation due to the amount of money he has, maybe he's just a headcase, or maybe he's on drugs...

Scott
Scott

Bring on the "Next Jeremy Lin" stories.

Ruthless_McLorg
Ruthless_McLorg

Your points are valid, and I agree that I don't think he will respond. But how the hell do you hide a pitcher in the fifth STARTING spot. I understand hiding him in the bullpen, but that simply AIN'T gonna happen.

Scott
Scott

Way to repudiate such brazen pedantry. I personally find bombast to be deplorable.

Stan
Stan

I think its telling that Mike Urban puts out that same vibe as Zito,same outlook, and all its gotten him for it is being canned by the status quo. Zito is one miraculous contract signing from being a "where are they now" broke and playing republican hippy in Venezuela or the Israel league for a decade after his Cy.

DM
DM

I did catch the part about the coaching for Zito, but wasn't sure if it was meant to be any kind of a correlation to Alex's struggles. Hence, the response. Alex's problems up to this point seem to be deeply rooted in his coaching, Zito's, as you have pointed out, come from within. Therefore it doesn't seem to be a fair comparison.

Stan
Stan

Since I was talking figurative..you yank him out of the 5th when he goes on his streaks of Homerunitis and losing. He's a wobbly 5th starter,and BASG hoping Zito turns it around doesnt take into account both Zito can't and Zito doesn't really care. How much you want to bet he chants a mantra of " I helped them win a World Series"..to make all his failures go away and make him happy again to bang his beauty queen wife and then go spend LOTS of money..endless more where that came from!

Scott
Scott

While we are on the subject of embroidering, what ever happened to FUBU? I loved their embroidered clothing (shirts, jeans, jackets, optimism, etc.).

Ruthless_McLorg
Ruthless_McLorg

And I should amend that - sucked and hated. Most people don't hate smith anymore

Ruthless_McLorg
Ruthless_McLorg

Their reasons for sucking are different, and yet if you asked BA sports fans who their top 2 worst players currently were, they would, without hesitation, say Zito and Alex Smith (top 3 would throw biedrins in there.). The comparison is not with how or why these players suck, but simply that they do, and the bay area hates them for it. If Zito could find a way not to suck, he would be quickly forgiven, simple as that. It's just the way we roll around here.

Ruthless_McLorg
Ruthless_McLorg

Questioning his motivation is extremely valid. Questioning his sobriety, more valid (what kind of drugs would you take if you had 126 million dollars?). Yeah, that's me, taking plenty of flack for this one. What you folks don't seem to understand us that I DON'T THINK ZITO WILL TURN IT AROUND. I'm just saying if he does the majority of the Giants fan base will totally forgive him whether they want to admit it or not. Perhaps not the blog reading community, who for the most part are bigger curmudgeons than Ratto himself, but all the murph and Mac listening Kruk and kuip lovers. They will be the ones with the fresh, clean Zito jerseys should he find a way to make a miracle happen.

Stan
Stan

Eh, I meant Senor Ruthless,not BASG.

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