Grant Cohn hasn’t been stopped, but he has been contained. For reasons unknown, Cohn deleted three blog posts and a string of tweets he wrote on Sunday about San Francisco 49ers offensive lineman Anthony Davis.

I saved a few of those tweets he wrote here, including this one:

There were several others, maybe 10 in all, and now they’re gone.

Also removed: two posts Cohn wrote on Sunday that I didn’t save (mostly because they were painful to read). The first post was titled, “The First Annual Anthony Davis, And To A Lesser Extent Colin Kaepernick, Writing Competition,” in which Cohn asked the commenters to rewrite this line: “Anthony Davis threw his hands up in the air and squealed like a child.”

After a couple hours or so, Cohn followed up with a post titled, “Winner announced in the First Annual Anthony Davis, And To A Lesser Extent Colin Kaepernick, Writing Competition.” I don’t remember what the winning entry was, but the actual contest was irrelevant. What was noteworthy was the unique tact Cohn used — unapologetically needling Davis and Kaepernick in such a pretentious and antagonistic manner. It was as if Cohn heard enough people say, “The pen is mightier than the sword” that he felt entitled to publicly escalate his feud with Davis and Kaepernick. It was an odd move on Cohn’s part, using the Press Democrat platform to further his Mean Girls-style feud with two professional athletes.

The reaction to the two posts could’ve played into why they were ultimately taken down. Some of the commenters scolded Cohn, even more insulted his writing skills, attitude and father. There were quite a few “#StopCohn” references. Very few comments came from people actually trying to “win” the contest.

Did the Press Democrat tell Grant to trash the evidence, or did Cohn himself decide to take whatever steps he could to put this episode behind him? Perhaps this was done to protect Cohn’s access to 49ers practices and games. Only Cohn knows, and it’s doubtful he’ll explain his reasoning for deleting everything.

This has to have been a stressful time for him, especially since Davis and many others were posting embarrassing photos from Cohn’s Facebook account. Cohn has since made his Facebook profile private.

It’s impossible to know if Cohn learned anything from this mess (other than the value of Facebook privacy settings), but deleting everything is a step in the right direction. Contrary to what he may have thought, the reason why this blew up wasn’t because of the way he phrased one or two sentences in a blog post about Randy Moss. It was his unapologetic stance and the complete lack of self-awareness he displayed, both in how he approached Davis on Friday (which led to a post that was also taken down, but the link includes what he wrote) and while writing those posts and tweets on Sunday. Everyone makes mistakes. Cohn didn’t exactly own up to his in this case, but at least he doesn’t seem quite as proud of them anymore.